Design it yourself…

FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the nearest RAIS dealer?

There are authorised RAIS dealers across the country. RAIS stoves are exclusively sold by authorised dealers. A RAIS-dealer is qualified to give good advice about RAI stoves and all matters associated with the use and installation of stoves and accompanying products. Chimneys included. You are always welcome to ask questions.
Click here to find the RAIS dealer closest to you.

Should we choose a wood-burning stove or an insert?

It is entirely up to you.
As heat sources, these two types are equally good. The combustion effectiveness and amount of heat are the same, in principle. In practice, an independent stove gives off heat faster than an insert. However, the insert accumulates and generates more even heat over a long period of time. A freestanding stove may be covered with natural stones to achieve the same accumulating effect. An insert is often selected for new buildings or renovations because it can be integrated into the architecture. It often saves space. And it is usually selected when rebuilding an open fireplace. After that, you get better heat economy. The modern, free-standing stove is also selected as part of the interior. RAIS stoves are all designed bearing in mind how you experience the room as well as the often almost sculptural appearance which fits well into the overall style of your home.

How to choose type and size?

It is important to select the stove which meets all wishes and requirements / both functional and design-related.
And, the size - i.e. the output or in other words the amount of heat generated by the stove - must match the room and the house in which the stove is to be integrated.
A modern stove can heat up between 10 and 20 square metres with normal headroom per kW. For example: stove specifications include minimum and maximum output: 3-7 kW. Let us take an average, say 5kW. And then multiply the 10-20 square metres by 5. In other words, 50-100 square metres
As you see, these specifications are quite broad.
They are contingent a lot on the quality of the building and the insulation. Otherwise, it will not be possible to utilise the full output of the stove.
Our ultra-modern stoves burn well at low power too. This is often what people wish for in modern low-energy houses or when they just need some extra comfort heating and fire just to enjoy the view of the flames.
So think over position, design and amount of heat. Make use of the dealer’s experience and good advice in the assessment process.

What requirements does the chimney have to comply with?

A well-functioning installation of a stove requires a chimney in good condition. It is generally a good idea to have the chimney sweeper inspect the chimney and the desired stove installation location.
To put it simply, the chimney is the driving force of the stove. Modern stoves impose major requirements on draught and chimney condition as compared to older stoves.
A stove can be connected both to a brick chimney and a steel pipe chimney.
There are different requirements concerning the number of connections to the same chimney as well as for the distance to the wall behind the stove.
If the stove is to be connected to a brick chimney, there has to be a flue inlet in the chimney and the flue has to be inserted into it. After that, it has to be sealed with the help of packing cord.
In order to connect a steel pipe, it is possible to use an uninsulated flue from the stove up to 225 mm from flammable roofing. From 225 mm below the roofing and up through the ceiling, the pipe must be insulated and the chimney must be equipped with a rain cover.
The chimney sweeper has to approve the ready connection.

Is a test certificate included?

Yes. When you purchase a RAIS stove, it is accompanied by a test certificate as required by regulations. This is your guarantee that the stove meets all environmental requirements and therefore can be installed legally. When the stove is in place, the chimney sweeper has to sign the certificate. After that: take care of it. If you should later need to install the stove elsewhere, the certificate is your proof that the stove complies with the regulations.
You can find your test certificate under the stove specifications here

Find your test certificate under the insert specifications here

How about a used stove?

Used stoves must comply with current environmental regulations in order to be re-installed in a legal manner.

How to select firewood?

All types of wood generate the same heat per kilogram given they have the same water content.
However, there are large differences between various types of wood.
For example, beech weighs a third more in cubic meter than spruce, which means that it takes more spruce to give out the same amount of heat as beech.
So, 2 cubic meters of beech when heated gives out the same warmth as 3 cubic meters of spruce. Therefore it is important to compare the prices for the different types of wood, especially when buying in pallets. There is also a difference in the way different firewood types burn. Beech and ash are good for burning because they produce a nice flame. Birch burns neatly and steadily and is also beautiful with its white bark.
Relative calorific value as compared to beech: Beech 100%, oak 100%, ash 98%, elm 96%, maple 93%, birch 88%, mountain pine 83%, Scots pine 75%, pine 67%, poplar 65%.

When purchasing firewood

When purchasing firewood, you must differentiate between loose cubic metre and solid cubic metre.
A loose cubic metre is the amount of firewood in a sack which measures, for example , 4x1 m x 60 cm or alternatively 2x2 m x 60 cm (a cord of wood). In other words, there is a lot of air between the wood and a stacked cord of wood with a length of 60 cm gives approx. 2.4 m3. A cord of non-stacked wood with a length of 30 cm gives approx. 3.3 m3 when loose.
A solid cubic metre measures the solid mass, i.e. only the firewood excluding the air in a stack or bag of wood. The solid mass percentage of a stack of 60 cm long firewood is approx. 65%.
The solid mass percentage of a stack of 30 cm long firewood is approx. 74%. A stacked cubic metre of wood consists of saw wood - normally approx. 30 cm long - and chopped wood, which is neatly stacked.
Wood is sold in standard bags of different sizes, ranging from 40 litres for big bags by pallet to up to 105x130 cm (Hydro pallet).

How much is a cubic metre?

When purchasing firewood, you must differentiate between loose cubic metre and solid cubic metre because these are not the same.
A loose cubic metre is the amount of firewood in a sack which measures, for example , 4x1 m x 60 cm or alternatively 2x2 m x 60 cm (a cord of wood). In other words, there is a lot of air between the wood and a stacked cord of wood with a length of 60 cm gives approx. 2.4 m3. A cord of non-stacked wood with a length of 30 cm gives approx. 3.3 m3 when loose.
A solid cubic metre measures the solid mass, i.e. only the firewood excluding the air in a stack or bag of wood. The solid mass percentage of a stack of 60 cm long firewood is approx. 65%.
The solid mass percentage of a stack of 30 cm long firewood is approx. 74%. A stacked cubic metre of wood consists of saw wood - normally approx. 30 cm long - and chopped wood, which is neatly stacked.
Wood is sold in standard bags of different sizes, ranging from 40 litres for big bags by pallet to up to 105x130 cm (Hydro pallet).

What if you fell, saw and store the wood yourself?

It may be worth it to produce wood yourself if you do not mind the time expenditure. This is a good way to get fresh air and exercise. There is also certain satisfaction of firing up your stove with wood you have gathered in the forest yourself.
First and foremost, remember to use the necessary safety gear. Helmet, safety glasses, safety clothing and hearing protection. If you are in doubt, look for safety instructions on felling and gathering wood on your own.
You can contact one of the many forestries in Norway to find out where you can cut your own wood. The price per cubic metre is usually based on the wood type and the wood is stacked before measurement and calculation. State-owned forests are managed by naturstyrelsen.dk.
You can either cut in metre logs or in the length you need for the stove. Remember that fresh wood is easier to cut than dry.
Wood splitters can be rented from building materials markets or other places. Remember also all safety instructions here.
If you cut and chop wood in the autumn and then stack it for one year, it will usually be ready for use the next winter.
Remember to give the firewood the best place in the garden where there is a lot of sun and good ventilation. The firewood is ready to use when dry. A humidity meter can be purchased at any building materials market. When the device shows up to 18%, you can put the firewood in the stove.

Is it possible to use other fuel besides wood? (No!)

The answer is no.
The firebox and air supply system in a RAIS stove is developed and manufactured for optimal combustion of firewood. The approval of RAIS stoves is based on it being a wood-burning stove. Only wood must be used in a RAIS wood burning stove.
Some manufacturers of wood-burning stoves claim that coke and briquettes may be used as fuel in their stoves. These types of fuel have considerably higher burn values than wood and when used for heating can surpass the maximum heat designated for the stove. This is called overfiring and can destroy the stove. If a RAIS stove breaks down due to overfiring, the guarantee is void.

Does having a wood-burning stove cause pollution?

When using dry, good firewood, fire up the stove properly and remove the ash when cooled off and preferably cover it to avoid problems. One of the advantages of a wood-burning stove is the quick accumulation of heat in the room due to the convection effect. If there is dust in the room, some of it might get into the stove, leading one to incorrectly assume that the stove generates dust. If you first vacuum the dust in the room, the stove will circulate clean air.

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